Pornography: Weaponized Degeneration of the Population

Nathaniel Mauka, Staff Writer
Waking Times

Warning: the nature of the subject matter in this article is not easy to mentally or emotionally digest. Please be advised before reading further.

You wouldn’t think of pornography as part of a social manipulation and mind control experiment, but when you understand the benefits of degrading our sexual morality and the cohesiveness of the family unit, it becomes clear that the rampant pedophilia and sexual sociopathy we see today didn’t happen by accident.

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India's Golden Quest To Tackle Black Money' & The Lessons From A Century Ago

Fergal O'Connor, University of York

The Indian government has been trying to reduce its citizen’s demand for imported gold through a number of means over the last few years. This is part of a wider crack down on currency used in the black market, that included the withdrawal and replacement of its two largest denomination bank notes in early November. The strategy will likely have some unintended consequences if we take our cues from the events of 1910.

Indians’ famous love for gold has created serious and ongoing economic issues for the nation. In 2011, Australian investment bank Macquarie estimated that 78% of India’s household savings were held in gold.

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Piping as Poison: The Flint Water Crisis and America's Toxic Infrastructure

Chris Sellers, Stony Brook University (The State University of New York)

As the crisis over the water in Flint, Michigan, rolls on, we’re learning more and more about the irresponsibility and callousness of officials and politicians in charge.

The mix of austerity politics, environmental racism and sheer ineptitude makes for a shocking brew, yet the physical conditions that have made it literally toxic for Flint residents are neither as exceptional nor as recent as much of the media coverage suggests.

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Is Hunting Moral? A Philosopher Unpacks The Question

Joshua Duclos, Boston University

Every year as daylight dwindles and trees go bare, debates arise over the morality of hunting. Hunters see the act of stalking and killing deer, ducks, moose and other quarry as humane, necessary and natural, and thus as ethical. Critics respond that hunting is a cruel and useless act that one should be ashamed to carry out.

As a nonhunter, I cannot say anything about what it feels like to shoot or trap an animal. But as a student of philosophy and ethics, I think philosophy can help us clarify, systematize and evaluate the arguments on both sides. And a better sense of the arguments can help us talk to people with whom we disagree.

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Health Check: The Untrue Story of Antioxidants V.S. Free Radicals

Emma Beckett, University of Newcastle and Mark Lucock, University of Newcastle

Antioxidants are a commonly promoted feature of health foods and supplements. They’re portrayed as the good forces that fight free radicals – nasty molecules causing damage thought to hasten ageing and cause chronic diseases.

The simple logic that antioxidants are “good” and free radicals are “bad”, has led to the idea that simply getting more antioxidants into our bodies, from foods or supplements, can outweigh the impacts of free radicals.

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The Myth Of The Disappearing Book

Simone Natale, Loughborough University and Andrea Ballatore, Birkbeck, University of London

After years of sales growth, major publishers reported a fall in their e-book sales for the first time this year, introducing new doubts about the potential of e-books in the publishing industry. A Penguin executive even admitted recently that the e-books hype may have driven unwise investment, with the company losing too much confidence in “the power of the word on the page.”

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It’s Official: Inequality, Climate Change & Social Polarisation Are Bad For You

Jonathan Michie, University of Oxford

This year’s Global Risks Report from the World Economic Forum warns that rising income inequality and societal polarisation could create further problems if urgent action isn’t taken -– and that’s after the car-crash that was 2016. Amen to that. It is somehow appropriate that the report is published just days after the death of Tony Atkinson, the social scientist who did more than any other to point to the importance of income inequality as an issue, and to argue that action could and should be taken.

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