Animated Documentary: Seeing the Invisible

A simple yet artistic look at how one man, changed the entire world's perspective on Earth and its inhabitants. Invisible to the naked eye, bacteria and microbes dominate our environment whether we perceive it or not. What should be impossible to human eyes was discovered to be an entirely different spectacle once 17th-century citizen scientist Antonie van Leeuwenhoek invented lenses to magnify these strange biological creatures. Produced by Flora Lichtman and Sharon Shattuck of the New York Times, this animated doc is a creative take on how his discovery changed our view of the biological world.

The Physics of Space Battles

Setting out to prove the realism behind our favorite Sci-fi flicks, PBS chooses to take a rational approach to scientific accuracy in this latest clip.  From space warfare to nuclear projectiles, this quick episode revisits some memorable moments in science fiction history and explains why concepts such as the Death Star, may not be as far-fetched as some of us believe.

The Hidden Universe of Fractals

Our entire universe holds a secret that many humans don't even realize or notice.  Hidden from plain-view, "fractals" are never-ending complex patterns which are self-similar across varying scales.  They are created by "fragmenting" or repeating a certain process over and over in a loop until a design is created.  Some notable examples of fractals in nature can be seen in trees, seashells, mountains, hurricanes and even entire galaxies.  Whether its generated through computer Mandelbrot Sets or by nature itself, the complexity of these systems can be vast and over-whelming to human perception.

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Scientists Map the Universe in this Amazing Video

It wasn't long ago that humans believed they were the center of the universe.  Now we have even more proof of how vast the cosmos stretches with a new study that involves the mapping of thousands of nearby galaxies.  Referred to as Laniakea, the supercluster contains more than 100,000 galaxies and stretches 500 million light years across. Our Milkyway is but a speck in this vast supercluster and each galaxy contains millions, perhaps billions of stars similar to our sun.  Check out this amazing clip for a high-definition look at these galaxies in action.

Earth images from Alexander Gerst in 4K

Exploring the beauty of our planet, this timelapse video was created with images ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst took while on the International Space Station.  As part of the International Space Station Expedition 40 crew, Gerst has been been spending five and a half months living and working on the ISS for his Blue Dot mission.  The artistic effects of the light trails from stars and cities at night are created by superimposing the individual images and fading them out slowly.

Creative animation explains Theories of Stephen Hawking

No time to read Stephen Hawking's A Brief History of Time? In just two and a half minutes, Alok Jha explains why black holes are doomed to shrink into nothingness then explode with the energy of a million nuclear bombs, and rewinds to the big bang and the origin of the universe?